Interrogation Techniques

WASHINGTON | | usa

WASHINGTON german-foreign-policy.com reports excerpts from a CIA document on Enhanced Interrogation Techniques. (Full text: documents.nytimes.com/c-i-a-reports-on-interrogation-methods#p=1 )

Central Intelligence Agency, Inspector General:

Special Review


Counterterrorism Detention and Interrogation Activities (September 2001 - October 2003)
7 May 2004

Enhanced Interrogation Techniques


(...)

During the walling technique, the detainee is pulled forward and then quickly and firmly pushed into a flexible false wall so that his shoulder blades hit the wall. His head and neck are supported with a rolled towel to prevent whiplash.

(...)

In cramped confinement, the detainee is placed in a confined space, typically a small or large box, which is usually dark. Confinement in the smaller space lasts no more than two hours and in the larger space it can last up to 18 hours.

Insects placed in a confinement box involve placing a harmless insect in the box with the detainee.

During wall standing, the detainee may stand about 4 to 5 feet from a wall with his feet spread approximately to his shoulder width. His arms are stretched out in front of him and his fingers rest on the wall to support all of his body weight. The detainee is not allowed to reposition his hands or feet.

(...)

Sleep deprivation will not exceed 11 days at a time.

The application of the waterboard technique involves binding the detainee to a bench with his feet elevated above his head. The detainee's head is immobilized and an interrogator places a cloth over the detainee's mouth and nose while pouring water onto the cloth in a controlled manner. Airflow is restricted for 20 to 40 seconds and the technique produces the sensation of drowning and suffocation.

(...)

DoJ Legal Analysis


(...)

The use of the following techniques and of comparable, approved techniques does not violate any Federal statute or other law, where the CIA interrogators do not specifically intend to cause the detainee to undergo severe physical or mental pain or suffering (i.e., they act with the good faith belief that their conduct will not cause such pain or suffering): isolation, reduced caloric intake (so long as the amount is calculated to maintain the general health of the detainees), deprivation of reading material, loud music or white noise (at a decibel level calculated to avoid damage to the detainee's hearing), the attention grasp, walling, the facial hold, the facial slap (insult slap), the abdominal slap, cramped confinement, wall standing, stress positions, sleep deprivation, the use of diapers, the use of harmless insects, and the water board.

(...)

Pressure Points


(...) In July 2002, (...) operations officer, participated with another operations officer in a custodial interrogation of a detainee (...) reportedly used a "pressure point" technique: with both of his hands on the detainee's neck, (...) manipulated his fingers to restrict the detainee's carotid artery.

(...)

Mock Executions


(...) The debriefer who employed the handgun and power drill on Al-Nashiri (...) advised that those actions were predicated on a technique he had participated in (...) The debriefer stated that when he was (...) between September and October 2002, (...) offered to fire a handgun outside the interrogation room while the debriefer was interviewing a detainee who was thought to be withholding information. (...) staged the incident, which included screaming and yelling outside the cell by other CIA officers and (...) guards. When the guards moved the detainee from the interrogation room, they passed a guard who was dressed as a hooded detainee, lying motionless on the ground, and made to appear as if he had been shot to death.

(...)

Use of Cold


(...)

Although the DCI Guidelines do not mention cold as a technique, the September 2003 draft OMS Guidelines on Medical and Psychological Support to Detainee Interrogations specifically identify an "uncomfortably cool environment" as a standard interrogation measure. (Appendix F.) The OMS Guidelines provide detailed instructions on safe temperature ranges, including the safe temperature range when a detainee is wet or unclothed.

(...)

Water Dousing


(...) According to (...) and others who have worked (...) "water dousing" has been used (...) since early 2003 when (...) officer introduced this technique to the facility. Dousing involves laying a detainee down on a plastic sheet and pouring water over him for 10 to 15 minutes. Another officer explained that the room was maintained at 70 degrees or more; the guards used water that was at room temperature while the interrogator questioned the detainee.

(...)

Abuse (...) at Other Locations Outside of the CTC Program


(...)

In June 2003, the U.S. military sought an Afghan citizen who had been implicated in rocket attacks on a Joint U.S. Army and CIA position in Asabad located in Northeast Afghanistan. On 18 June 2003, this individual appeared at Asabad Base at the urging of the local Governor. The individual was held in a detention facility guarded by U.S. soldiers from the Base. During the four days the individual was detained, an Agency independent contractor, who was a paramilitary officer, is alleged to have severely beaten the detainee with a large metal flashlight and kicked him during interrogation sessions. The detainee died in custody on 21 June; his body was turned over to a local cleric and returned to his family on the following date without an autopsy being performed.

(...)