BERLIN/DOHA |

BERLIN/DOHA (Own report) - EADS is seeking to sell 60 Eurofighter jet fighters to the United Arab Emirates, thereby continuing the arms buildup of the Arabian Peninsula's dictatorships. In the war on Libya, Eurofighters passed the test for deadly efficiency and specialist circles advertize that it could now provide the Emirati air force with the best firepower. Saudi Arabia is already equipped with this EU jet fighter. The Persian Gulf dictatorships are considered the West's most important allies in a possible war with Iran, which western establishment circles envisage for next year. This is why, for years the countries on the Arabian Peninsula were supplied the most modern combat equipment and integrated in joint combat maneuvers. The Emirate Qatar, with which Berlin is intensifying its cooperation, has, since some time, been playing a major role. During the war on Libya, it was not only engaged with combat planes, it also had sent ground troops to support the West's allied rebels. German President, Christian Wulff will soon visit Qatar to intensify Berlin's relations to that dictatorship, which is offering more often to help Europe and the USA - in the meantime, possibly even in Syria. more…

BERLIN/TEHERAN | | iran

BERLIN/TEHERAN (Own report) - With its call to "considerably strengthen" sanctions against Iran, Berlin is participating in the intensification of western pressure on Teheran. Next week, the EU foreign ministers want to impose new punitive measures against members of Iran's establishment to force the Iranian regime to accommodate western demands in the so-called nuclear dispute. This conflict is, in fact, over hegemony, with the West seeking to defend at all costs its predominance in the Middle Eastern resource-rich regions. Demands are becoming louder for military attacks next year, to crush an ambitious Iran. In Berlin, the debate is continuing around whether to take part in a possible war. Whereas transatlantic-oriented forces are calling for just that, other circles, oriented toward a more clear rivalry with the USA, are demanding a durable imposition of western hegemony in the Middle East using cold war methods ("transformation through rapprochement"). The current developments throughout the Middle East could give those favoring military measures the advantage - possibly decisively. more…

BERLIN/WASHINGTON/NAYPYIDAW |

BERLIN/WASHINGTON/NAYPYIDAW (Own report) - As part of their anti-Chinese efforts to gain influence in Southeast Asia, Berlin and Washington have signaled a change in policy toward Myanmar (Burma), a regime they had been vehemently fighting. At the end of last week, the US president announced that US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton would travel to Myanmar in December. German State Secretary for Foreign Affairs Werner Hoyer visited that country in early November, to initiate a resumption of so-called development aid. German Minister of Development Dirk Niebel will fly to the capital Naypyidaw early next year to initiate the following steps. This change of policy is due to the earlier confrontation policy's lack of success: The People's Republic of China, for which Myanmar is of great geostrategic significance, is still holding an exclusive position in that country. The West seeks to exploit contradictions in the Myanmar establishment, to strengthen its own position - this time by way of cooperation (“transformation through rapprochement"). The efforts being made by Washington and the transatlantic wing of Berlin's foreign policymakers to gain influence in Myanmar are part of the recently announced official strategy to reinforce their positions in the countries of the Pacific region - against China. more…

BERLIN |

BERLIN (Own report) - Berlin is demanding a predominating voting majority in the principal EU institutions. According to reports in the Spanish business press, the German government will insist at the next EU summit in early December on a redistribution of vote weighting in the European Central Bank (ECB): In the future, the votes should be weighted in accordance with the country's Gross National Product (GNB). Thus, Germany would attain a predominating position in the most important European monetary institution - not only temporarily, but most likely on a long-term basis. The current principle of equality among sovereign countries would be cancelled. The demand, which has not yet been officially formulated by the German government, is a continuation of the reorganization of the Eurozone along the lines of German interests. Berlin’s leading politicians have commented on this reorganization, which has been taking place for quite some time saying Europe is facing "a new era." Volker Kauder, chair of the CDU/CSU parliamentary group and a confidant of the German Chancellor, succinctly summarized this development saying, "now Europe will speak German." more…

ERFURT |

ERFURT (Own report) - New revelations on the neo-Nazi serial murders of nine men of non-German origin and a female police officer are incriminating a German domestic intelligence agency. According to media reports, a member of a recently discovered neo-Nazi terror group presumably had contact to the Thuringia Office for the Protection of the Constitution - even after he went underground. The affair could become an "intelligence agency problem," predicts the domestic policy spokesman of the CDU/CSU parliamentary group, Hans-Peter Uhl. In the 1990s, under the pretext that they are very important informants, the Thuringia Office for the Protection of the Constitution had, in fact, paid amounts of DMs in the six-digits to influential right-wing extremist militants. The militants used this money to set up neo-Nazi structures in Thuringia, including the "Thüringer Heimatschutz" (Thuringia Homeland Protection), an organization of violent neo-Nazis. The members of the terror group, responsible for the murders, are not the only ones who have their origins in this organization. Leading functionaries of today's extreme right are also coming from that organization, which has been officially disbanded, but is still at work in other structures. Today some of its militants, for example, are organizing neo-Nazi festivals with international participation aimed at networking the extreme right throughout Europe. more…

BERLIN |

BERLIN (Own report) - The German government should focus its arms buildup on its naval forces also to be prepared for rivalry with the People's Republic of China, according to a foreign policy expert. In an article published in the leading German foreign policy magazine, the expert calls on Germany to focus on the military protection of its commercial vessels, because its affluence, to a large degree, depends on maritime trade. This is particularly important in the Indian Ocean, where an "arms race" can be expected between China and India. Since some time, German experts have been attentively watching the naval arms buildup of China, its South East Asian neighbors and India - also from the perspective of possible conflicts between Beijing and Washington. China has important interests in the Western Pacific, where "Asia's strategic maritime trade routes" cross and "rich deposits of oil, gas and minerals" have been discovered, note German naval experts. Recently, Beijing was quite irritated by US naval presence in this region. Whereas Washington is reinforcing its naval activities and alliances in the Western Pacific, German strategists are focusing on the Indian Ocean, China's western sphere of interests. more…

MONROVIA/BERLIN | | liberia

MONROVIA/BERLIN (Own report) - The front-runner in today's run-off elections for the Liberian presidency, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, is a staunch western ally. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said that she "made an excellent contribution toward the reconstruction of her country." In reality, Johnson-Sirleaf has, without hesitation, surrendered accessibility to Liberia's abundant mineral resources to international companies. Among these resources are the largest untapped iron ore deposits. The population is not benefiting from the exploitation of these resources. Liberia remains one of the world's poorest countries, with a largely destroyed infrastructure and more than 80 percent of the population being unable to find regular employment. However, Germany is also seeking to have its companies more strongly represented in Liberia's mineral sector. This is a reflection of the intensifying rivalry between industrial nations over access to important raw materials. Berlin is supporting Johnson-Sirleaf, known for her pro-western policies. more…

LEVERKUSEN/NEW DELHI | | indien

LEVERKUSEN/NEW DELHI (Own report) - Critics of Germany's Bayer Corp. are calling for an investigation into deaths during Bayer's testing of medicines in India. In 2010, alone, at least five people died from side effects in the course of testing the new medicine Xarelto, which the company has hopes of making millions in turnovers. Bayer is carrying out numerous clinical studies in India because the conditions there are more cost effective - "a large reservoir of test persons, unbeatable prices, rapid processing and a deficient supervision," explain observers. The deaths must be clarified as soon as possible. For years, Bayer, in the course of its expansion into Asia, has also been expanding its business relations with India, but with less progress than hoped. The company seeks to attain a one billion Euro company turnover by 2015, which would necessitate the expansion of the pharmaceutical sector into India. The German company, which until recently had denied having problems with side effects in its medical tests, is fervently pushing ahead with its expansion. more…

BERLIN |

BERLIN (Own report) - Berlin is preparing for a growing number of foreign military interventions, according to the defense minister and a retired lieutenant colonel of the Bundeswehr. "The question of the deployment of our armed forces will most likely be posed more often in the future," reckons Defense Minister Thomas de Maizière in an interview with the magazine "Internationale Politik." Particularly so-called minor wars have to be expected, declares a senior officer in the magazine's current edition, focusing on the topic "what kind of troops does Germany need for the future." "Minor wars," for example, include counterinsurgency. By concentrating on this theme, "Internationale Politik" would like to initiate a larger debate on warfare. The German society has difficulty "openly discussing power - which in the end includes military force," according to the head editor. Berlin is increasingly seeing war as an ordinary foreign policy instrument. The defense minister is underlining this, when he declares, "military means are the ultimate and not merely the last means." more…

BERLIN/FRANKFURT-MAIN |

BERLIN/FRANKFURT-MAIN (Own report) - Following the German victory at the Euro Crisis Summit, Berlin has been preparing the next steps for expanding its unabashed hegemony over Europe. An option, permitting direct intervention into the national budgets of indebted countries, is to be inscribed as soon as possible in EU treaties. This would remove key aspects of state activity from democratic control and expose, particularly the southern Euro countries to Berlin's permanent direct interventions. At the same time, the German government is pushing the transformation of the Eurozone into a future core Europe. Just last week, the non-Euro countries - including Great Britain - were excluded from significant summit decisions. Experts see this as creating a two-speed Europe, and warn that Berlin, in light of German predominance, should not become "the new Brussels." German media has been accompanying Berlin's summit victory with vociferous jubilation and even blatant chauvinism, giving an idea of the true character of Berlin's emerging domination. more…