Spende german-foreign-policy.com
Anzeige
News in brief
Aufnahmestopp
13.11.2015
Nach der partiellen Schließung der schwedischen Grenzen für Flüchtlinge verhängt das erste deutsche Bundesland einen Aufnahmestopp.

EU oder Krieg
09.11.2015
Luxemburgs Außenminister Jean Asselborn warnt vor einem Zerfall der EU.

Neue Lager
15.09.2015
Die Innenminister der EU haben sich auf Maßnahmen geeinigt, die Flüchtlinge aus Deutschland fernhalten sollen.

Krieg in Europa?
24.09.2014
Der ehemalige Bundeskanzler Helmut Schmidt warnt vor einem neuen Krieg in Europa.

Verletzte ausgeflogen
03.09.2014
Die Bundeswehr hat 20 verwundete Kämpfer aus der Ukraine zur Behandlung nach Deutschland ausgeflogen.

Außen und innen
26.08.2014
Der deutsche Außenminister moniert eine mangelnde Zustimmung in der Bevölkerung für eine offensive deutsche Weltpolitik.

Die Verantwortung Berlins
20.05.2014
Der ehemalige EU-Kommissar Günter Verheugen erhebt im Konflikt um die Ukraine schwere Vorwürfe gegen Berlin.

"Ein gutes Deutschland"
30.04.2014
Das deutsche Staatsoberhaupt schwingt sich zum Lehrmeister der Türkei auf.

Die Dynamik des "Pravy Sektor"
11.03.2014
Der Jugendverband der NPD kündigt einen "Europakongress" unter Beteiligung des "Pravy Sektor" ("Rechter Sektor") aus der Ukraine an.

Der Mann der Deutschen
18.02.2014
Die deutsche Kanzlerin hat am gestrigen Montag zwei Anführer der Proteste in der Ukraine empfangen.

Brussels' Provocations
2017/05/08
BERLIN/LONDON
(Own report) - German business associations are calling on the EU Commission to end its Brexit provocations. An unorderly Brexit would entail enormous costs for the German economy, the President of the German Chambers of Industry and Commerce (DIHK) warned; therefore an amicable Brexit agreement with London must be reached. The Federation of German Industries (BDI) expressed a similar view. The head of the EU's Commission's recent audacious financial demands and deliberate indiscretions have stirred massive resentment in the United Kingdom and were rightfully considered an attempt to influence Britain's upcoming parliamentary elections. Observers attribute these indiscretions to EU Commissioner Jean-Claude Juncker's German Chief of Staff, Martin Selmayr (CDU), who is currently playing a key role in the Commission's Brexit negotiations' preparations. The German Chancellery is now calling for restraint in view of the severe damage a hard Brexit could entail for the German economy.
The Commission's Indiscretions
German businesses are complaining about the EU Commission's recent provocations: On the one hand, the deliberate indiscretions concerning confidential talks on April 26 in London between the British Prime Minister, Theresa May, the President of the EU Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, and their respective closest collaborators in preparation of Brexit negotiations. The alleged contents of the talks were leaked to a German newspaper, which published a detailed report, spiked with assessments, presenting the British government as blind to reality, uncompromising and disunited.[1] Juncker's statements, reproduced in the report, are rightfully regarded in Britain as an attempt to tarnish Theresa May's conservative government and thereby reinforce EU-oriented forces, particularly among the Liberal Democrats and segments of the Labour Party during the election campaign - apparently to no avail: The obvious attempt to interfere in the country's internal affairs has stirred massive resentment in the United Kingdom. In last week's local elections in various parts of the country, all pro-EU parties, except the Welsh Plaid Cymru, lost mandates, whereas the conservative party made substantial gains. In spite of the significance of particularities in local elections, this is regarded as an expression of the wide approval for May's political course.
Berlin's Special Role
London has taken note of the special role Germany is playing in this affair. The indiscretions were published in a German newspaper and were probably leaked by the German EU official Martin Selmayr, a member of the CDU. Selmayr is Commission President Juncker's Chief of Staff, and, according to reports, he is closely allied with Chancellery Minister Peter Altmeier. He is considered to be Juncker's most important prompter, having a "tight grip" on the Commission, according to observers. (german-foreign-policy.com reported.[2]) He also holds a prominent position in the Brexit negotiations: Last October, Juncker mandated him to conduct regular preliminary talks on the Brexit negotiations with London. In the meantime, Selmayr has repeatedly announced that “Brexit will never become a success,"[3] thereby following Berlin's suggestion that the Brexit could possibly have a deterrent effect on EU critics in other member countries. Selmayr is suspected of having leaked the recent indiscretions, because they contained also those parts of the confidential talks in London, in which only he and Juncker had participated on behalf of the EU. Michel Barnier, the chief Brexit negotiator, and his deputy, Sabine Weyand, joined the talks only later on April 26. Alongside Selmayr, trade expert Weyand is the second German in a decisive procedural position in the Brexit negotiations.
100 Billion Euros
Alongside this indiscretion, the most recent hike in the amount Brussels is demanding that London pay for its exit from the EU is being met with resentment in Great Britain. Even the 60 billion euros, mentioned a while back must be seen - to put it mildly - as an unrealistically exorbitant starting point for the negotiations. Last week, the commission increased the amount even further, to €100 billion, according to which, two years after its exit, the United Kingdom is to pay, for example, agricultural subsidies for other EU countries, as well as EU administrative costs, alongside co-financing both the European Central Bank (ECB) and the refugee agreement with Turkey. On the other hand, London would not be able to lay any claims to its share of the EU's assets.[4] Observers suppose that these unorthodox demands have been ultimately raised to increase pressure on London's government and lower its re-election possibilities in favor of EU-oriented forces - until now, to no avail.
More Strain on Germany
Instead, Brussels' provocations are now leading to public complaints from the German economy. Britain is its third largest sales market for the highly export-dependent German industry and its second largest foreign investment site. At a time when business with important business partners is suffering - due to sanctions (Russia) or political tensions (Turkey), when trade with its most important ally, the United States, has become unreliable with the recent change of government and its number one sales market - the Euro zone - remains deeply embedded in a crisis, German business associations are adamantly refusing to take on any more risks.[5] "Now, it is important not to smash any more porcelain during the talks," warns Dieter Kempf, President of the Federation of German Industries (BDI), in reference to Brexit negotiations. "Reason and pragmatism" must be the guidelines for "both" negotiating partners.[6] One should not forget "that the Brexit will come at high costs, also for the German economy," warned Eric Schweitzer, President of the German Chambers of Industry and Commerce (DIHK). An unorderly Brexit, in which merely WTO standards apply between the EU-27 and Great Britain, trade between Great Britain and the EU would engender trade tariffs of around twelve billion euros. Because of the extensive exports to the United Kingdom, this "would engender an enormous additional strain, also on German enterprises."[7]
Calls for Restraint
Over the weekend, the first calls for restraint had been heard in Berlin because of complaints from within business circles, and the fact that the EU provocations seem to be backfiring in the United Kingdom. Chancellor Angela Merkel made known that she is "upset" about Commission President Juncker, because "his failed Brexit dinner" has only made the climate worse between Brussels and London.[8] The German MEP Ingeborg Grässle (CDU), chair of the European Parliament’s budgetary control committee, criticized Juncker in the name of the European Parliament. "It is time that the EU Commission presents a bill comprehensible for everyone," she demanded in view of the sum London has to pay for the Brexit. "We want to maintain good relations with the British." The most recent demands - a good example of the EU Commission's dealing - are "completely exaggerated."[9]
top print
© Informationen zur Deutschen Außenpolitik

info@german-foreign-policy.com

Valid XHTML 1.0!